Info

Parenting Teens: The Biggest Job We’ll Ever Have Podcast

Do you feel that parenting teens is the biggest job you’ll ever have? Are you wondering about how to help your child discover his or her unique potential? Are you dedicated to raising a child with character and integrity? Based on the Hyde School’s philosophy of “parents are the primary teachers and the home is the primary classroom,” this podcast was created to help parents understand just how to put this philosophy in place in the home, and to discover the transformative outcomes that happen in families who implement it. You will hear from not only experts in the field of raising teenagers, such as educational consultants, authors, and therapists, but also hear from former Hyde parents and students who share their stories of challenges and triumphs on this journey. We welcome you to jump in and start discovering some “ah ha” moments and practices you can implement right away to bring your family closer together and raise self-confident teenagers with character who become inspiring adults.
RSS Feed
Parenting Teens: The Biggest Job We’ll Ever Have Podcast
2017
November
October
January


2016
December
November
October
September
July
June
May
April


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: 2017
Nov 20, 2017

Have you ever wished for more meaningful communication in your family? Or how about just more communication?

In this podcast, Director of The Biggest Job Family program at the Hyde School, Mary Moore, describes the difference she saw in her family relationships when they started having family meetings. At first, she felt the meetings were hoakie, but after the first several, she realized there was a different level of trust developing between her children, her husband and herself.

Tune in and find out how you can do family meetings in your home; with commitment and letting go of outcomes, you, too, might establish a deeper level of trust between you and your kids.

Resources:

Nov 13, 2017

Most of us know that sports teams all have leaders. However, would it be possible for everyone on the team to be a leader? Wouldn’t that create confusion, or chaos?

“No,” says Bechler in his most recent book, The Leadership Playbook: Become Your Team’s Most Valuable Leader. “Everyone on the team needs to be striving to do their best, and be their best. It’s called collective responsibility; you are your brother’s keeper; what you do affects others.”

The Leadership Playbook by Jamy Bechler

This book teaches anyone who wants to be a leader on a team, or in life, the importance of having core principles and living by them; the importance of leading yourself, and how to do it; how to lead regardless of your role on a team.

Listen to the podcast with Jamy and learn more of what’s in the book, how he came to write it, and his views on the importance of character for kids and parents, whether you’re on a sports team, a work team, or a family team. 

Resources:

Nov 6, 2017

Are teenage girls really difficult to raise? Not according to Robin Axelrod Sabag, who is the author of Strong Girls, Strong Parents: A Guide to Raising Teenage Girls in a New Era.

Not only will you enjoy this podcast, you’ll love the book. Robin is enthusiastic as she imparts many tips for parents of girls and gives background information on understanding why they are the way they are in their teens. 

Robin’s website is www.robinsabagtherapy.com and you can find her book on amazon.com

Oct 23, 2017

Do you ever wish you had a map and compass for parenting? The 100 Lessons that go with The Five Fundamentals of Parenting might be the closest thing you will find.

In this series, Laura Gauld, co-author of The Biggest Job We’ll Ever Have, will talk about 20 lessons that go with each of the Five Fundamentals. Tune in to the first five lessons, and learn how to do the right thing as a parent, present a united front, and the importance of parenting from your principles, rather than from fear, guilt or control.

Here is a break down of the first 5 Lessons Laura talks about in this podcast of the first Parenting Fundamental, "Understand Your Job as Parents";

  1. Parents are the primary teacher and home is the primary classroom.
    There are many influences in today’s youth culture that threaten the important growth process of a child. We must remember that the parent is the primary role model and the home is the primary atmosphere for developing character. Our job is to raise our children to be adults that are honest, decent contributors to the world.

  2. We can be friendly, but we can’t be friends.
    Our parenting culture has shifted to a model that encourages “friendship” which misses the point. We can have friendly moments but our children need us to be their parents. Parents now leads to friends later.

  3. Do the right thing, even if it goes against the culture or your earlier stance.
    Our job is not to be right, it is to do the best we can each day. As new information comes our way, we continue to make the next right step. Never feel guilty for changing your answer or stance if you know it is the right thing. Your child will thank you later.

  4. Parent from your principles, not from fear, guilt or control.
    Fear and guilt will not inspire yourself or your child. Have the courage to acknowledge your core principles and build your foundation of parenting around them.

  5. Present a united front.
    So many parents miss this simple but powerful truth; divided you will fall! Your children will manipulate if she can and you will be left fighting with each other. Work to stand together with either your spouse, partner, or committed adult in your child’s life.

Resources:

Jan 30, 2017

As most parents know, letting go of our children is very hard; we don’t want to see them fail and we often don’t want them to be unhappy. But how do our kids feel when we can’t let go?

This podcast is with a mom, Sally Ross, and her daughter, Bryn Nolan, who graduated from Hyde, and who have a mature, open, and honest relationship with each other. The daughter talks about how grateful she is that she’s learned to be independent, and the mother shares with us the importance of not being afraid to let your child struggle.

They both offer parents some valuable advice on raising responsible kids. 

Resources:

Jan 9, 2017

Imagine a school where every student cared – really cared and was concerned – about the best in their fellow students?

Where the discipline and structure of the school was the responsibility of the students, and not just the teachers? 

This concept, originally called Brother’s Keeper and now being called Each Other’s Keeper, is one of the most important concepts of Hyde’s basic tenets: Be the best possible you

We can’t be the best on our own; we need the help and concern of those around us to achieve our best.

Malcolm Gauld, president of Hyde Schools, explains it best.

Links:

1